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Itineraries

When to visit

When to visit Botswana?
Month Rating
Jan Good 'Green Season' with rain but beautiful landscapes
Feb Good 'Green Season' with rain but beautiful landscapes
Mar Good 'Green Season' with rain but beautiful landscapes
Apr Best Generally dry days and cool nights. Large wildlife concentrations
May Best Generally dry days and cool nights. Large wildlife concentrations
Jun Best Warm, dry days but cool nights
Jul Best Great game viewing in Okavango, Chobe and Linyanti and warm, dry days but cool nights
Aug Best Elephant herds in Chobe and warm, dry days but cool nights
Sep Best Great game viewing in Okavango, Chobe and Linyanti. Warm, dry days
Oct Best Hottest of the 'dry' season and animals gather around watering holes
Nov Best Warm, dry weather with animals gathering around watering holes
Dec Good High day time temperatures but regular rainfall
Best Good Mixed

Discover more

Bali is an Indonesian island known for its forested volcanic mountains, iconic rice paddies, beaches and coral reefs. The island is home to religious sites such as cliffside Uluwatu Temple. To the south, the beachside city of Kuta has lively bars, while Seminyak, Sanur and Nusa Dua are popular resort towns. The island is also known for its yoga and meditation retreats. Bali is picturesque that you could be fooled into thinking it was an artistic masterpiece with over 20,000 temples and palaces, coupled together with colorful festivals, music and dance is testimony to the island’s rich heritage. Kuta Beach – first discovered in the 60’s, and once a sleepy fishing village – has now transformed into the centre of Bali’s nightlife and action. Legian is where the locals, tourists and expats all mingle. Bargaining, beach activities, indulging in massages, meditating or simply reading – you name it, it’s available! For a holiday where the emphasis is on relaxation, visit Jimbaran or Sanur Beaches; whilst Nusa Dua caters for the more upmarket taste and is ideal for families and the water sport enthusiast. If beaches aren’t your ideal, then visit Ubud, where the culture and lifestyle of the Balinese waits to be discovered. 
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Iconic Attractions

Pura Tanah Lot

About 20 kilometers northwest of Kuta, Pura Tanah Lot (“Pura” means temple in Balinese) is one of Bali’s most iconic temples thanks to its spectacular seaside setting on a rocky islet surrounded by crashing waves. For the Balinese people, it is one of the most sacred of all the island’s sea temples. (The largest and holiest Hindu temple in Bali is Pura Besakih, but recently local hagglers have been harassing visitors.) Every evening, throngs of tourists from Kuta, Legian, and Sanur find their way through a labyrinth of lanes lined by souvenir sellers to watch the sun setting behind the temple. Pura Tanah Lot was built at the beginning of the 16th century and is thought to be inspired by the priest Nirartha, who asked local fishermen to build a temple here after spending the night on the rock outcrop. Although foreigners can’t enter any of the temples, you can walk across to the main temple at low tide, and it’s fun to wander along the paths taking photos and soaking up the magnificent setting.

Mount Batur

Every day in Bali’s predawn darkness, hundreds of visitors begin the trek up the 1,700-meter summit of Mount Batur to watch the sun rise above the lush mosaic of mist-shrouded mountains and the caldera far below. This sacred active volcano lies in Kintamani District in Bali’s central highlands, about an hour’s drive from Ubud, and the hike to the summit to watch the sunrise has long graced the list of top things to do in Bali. The hike along the well-marked trails is relatively easy and usually takes about two to three hours. Guided treks typically include a picnic breakfast, with eggs cooked by the steam from the active volcano. On a clear day, the views are spectacular, stretching all the way across the Batur caldera; the surrounding mountain range; and beautiful Lake Batur, the island’s main source of irrigation water. Sturdy hiking shoes are essential, and it’s advisable to wear layers, as the temperature can be cool before sunrise.

Uluwatu Temple

Presiding over plunging sea cliffs above one of Bali’s best surf spots, Uluwatu Temple (Pura Luhur Uluwatu) is one of the island’s most famous temples, thanks to its magnificent clifftop setting. In Balinese, “Ulu” means “tip” or “land’s end” and “Watu” means rock, a fitting name for the location of the temple on the Bukit Peninsula along the island’s southwestern tip. Like Pura Tanah Lot, sunset is the best time to visit, when the sky and sea glow in the late afternoon light.

Ubud Monkey Forest

Only 10 minutes’ walk south of the town center in Ubud, the Monkey Forest, also known as the Sacred Monkey Forest Sanctuary, is one of the top attractions in this tourist town and a must-see for animal lovers and photographers. Besides the entertaining troops of grey long-tailed macaques that make their home here, a large part of the appeal is the evocative jungle setting where the monkeys roam free. On the southwest side of the forest is one of the three temples found in the forest, the 14th-century Pura Dalem Agung Padangtegal, where hundreds of monkeys swing through the trees and clamber over the walls. In the northwest of the forest, an ancient bathing temple, Pura Beji, nestles next to a cool stream and makes a beautiful backdrop for watching the monkey’s antics. While visiting the forest, make sure to secure your belongings and avoid direct eye contact with the animals (and smiling), as this can be interpreted as a sign of aggression. It’s also a good idea not to bring any food into the area.

Ubud Art & Culture

Made famous by the book and movie Eat, Pray, Love, Ubud is also the epicenter of Balinese art and culture. This is where the modern Balinese art movement was born, with the surrounding royal palaces and temples acting as the main patrons. Today, several excellent local museums and galleries celebrate its evolution and traditions. Art gazing is particularly rewarding here, as many collections are housed in traditional Balinese buildings surrounded by serene tropical gardens.

Tegallalang and Jatiluwih Rice Terraces in Bali

If you’re a photographer seeking to capture Bali’s beautiful emerald-hued rice fields, the Tegallalang or Jatiluwih rice terraces are a must-see. About a 30-minute drive north of Ubud, Tegallalang Rice Terraces are one of the most famous areas to photograph these iconic landscapes and absorb their timeless beauty. Be aware that locals ask for donations along the most popular trail through the rice fields here, and many request fees for entrance and parking along the road. A relaxing way to enjoy the lush landscapes is at one of the many restaurants and cafes overlooking the fields.

Waterbom Bali

Waterbom Bali is an action-packed waterpark, in the heart of Kuta, with something for every member of the family. Kids can splash in the swimming pools; drift down the Lazy River; or zoom down one of the many twisting water slides and rides, with names like the Python, Green Viper, and Super Bowl. Moms and dads can relax with a reflexology session, manicure or pedicure, or fish spa therapy. Restaurants and cafes cater to a range of different diets, and the grounds are landscaped with large, shady trees and beautiful tropical gardens, making this a refreshing respite from the heat on a hot tropical day.

Pura Ulun Danu Bratan

On a small island along the western shore of Lake Bratan, in the cool highlands of central Bali, the 17th-century Pura Ulun Danu Bratan is one of Bali’s most picturesque temple complexes. Set against the imposing backdrop of Gunung Bratan, the thatched temples reflect on the lake, and when the water levels rise, they seem to float on its surface. Lake Bratan is one of Bali’s main sources of irrigation and drinking water, and the temple complex is dedicated to Dewi Danu, goddess of the sea and lakes.

Kuta Beach

This famous stretch of sand, along with neighboring Legian and Seminyak Beaches just to the north, is still a fun day out, especially if you’re a beginner surfer or you just want to soak up the scene. You can book surf lessons and rent surfboards, boogie boards, sun loungers, and umbrellas directly from vendors set up on the sand, and plenty of cafes and restaurants border the beach. Beach vendors are easily dissuaded with a polite “no thank you,” but an icy cold coconut sloshing with juice served directly to your sunlounger can be a blessing on a sultry day.

The Sekumpul Waterfall

In the Singaraja region in Bali’s north, Sekumpul Waterfall, actually a series of about seven falls, is considered by many to be Bali’s most beautiful falls. Most hikers hire a local guide to do the three- to four-hour round-trip trek, which passes by bristling rice terraces and local villages rimmed with rambutan and durian trees, and continues through dense tropical jungle. It can be strenuous in parts, as you need to hike down slippery steps and slosh through a river, but once you arrive, you can cool off with a refreshing swim at the base of the falls. This is a great adventure for nature lovers who want a taste of wild Bali far from the touristy resorts.

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